I dare say we are on our way.

I dare say we are on our way.

edwardspoonhands:

sleepywinchesters:

edwardspoonhands:

Sometimes when I’m making a video, I realize that I’m forcing myself to have a unique opinion on a topic when, in fact, it isn’t an honest opinion….it’s just me searching for something interesting to say. That’s OK, I guess, but I’ve been trying not to do it as much. 

Sometimes I’m not interesting. I like science fiction books and taking pictures and watching the same TV shows as everyone else. It’s exhausting to try and make every single part of your existence interesting. I hereby give myself permission to be boring.

I feel that way about designing a lot. I think it’s part of being creative- there’s this constant need to come up with new ideas but that pressure only comes from within. And ultimately you have to accept that being like everyone else isn’t a bad thing sometimes. It just means you’re human and can’t fire on all pistons all the time.

Oh yeah, the very worst things I ever designed were when I was like “I’m so sick of how everybody does things…I want to do something really NEW!” And then I do something that no one else would ever do…

…because of how terrible it is.

I find an incredible value in integrity, especially when it comes to disseminating information to a large group. Occasionally people need to be reassured that having an average, everyday perspective on a topic is totally okay, so long as that is their genuine opinion. Often times there are incredibly polar, dichotomous viewpoints out there than don’t allow for middle-of-the-line impressions, leaving people who otherwise had made up their mind to all of the sudden shrug their shoulders in uncertainty. There is far too much to question in the world for us to also be questioning what we believe to hold true. Sticking to our guns is what makes us the unique individuals we are, even if sometimes that aligns with the popular opinion. 

If I am certain about anything

it’s that you will be so much happier and productive and joyful if you surround yourself with people who treat the world like their oyster, people who say Yes, people who see a problem as a challenge to be solved and not a detriment to progress. I became a much better person when I stopped spending energy on the apathetic, indifferent, the shallow, and instead inserted myself into situations with people who cherish the joy of life.

Tags: life lessons

The painting is just as much about the process as the final work - I’ve never been the type to imagine the final product and then execute it accordingly. The storm changes and morphs on the canvas from session to session, the clouds with a mind of their own and determined to take shape despite my direction, demanding to be reinterpreted.

The painting is just as much about the process as the final work - I’ve never been the type to imagine the final product and then execute it accordingly. The storm changes and morphs on the canvas from session to session, the clouds with a mind of their own and determined to take shape despite my direction, demanding to be reinterpreted.

Tags: painting p4a

I’ve just gotta keep telling myself that I’m not going to answer all of my biggest questions and solve all of my deepest anxieties at four in the morning

Reunited at last - my senior thesis painting ‘20 Miles East of Faith,’ 2011. Acrylic on panel, 13,5’ x 8’.

This work went through innumerable iterations before I settled on these dimensions and presentation. I wanted to create a work that was evocative and immersive, one that would suck the viewer in to the storm whether or not they wanted to participate.

This painting is an homage to the resilience of Midwestern agricultural leaders, to those individuals who rely on the land for their livelihood and who must endure as the landscape changes to create unavoidable challenges. There is nothing else between the person and the storm: they watch it coming, boiling on the distant horizon, unsure if those clouds carry promise or destruction.

Progress photos of the Project for Awesome painting so far. 

Acrylic on canvas, 44” x 28”. 

There is nothing you can do to an artwork that can’t be undone, no mistake so great it can’t be painted over. 

This thing has taken on a mind of its own. 
I continue to paint with a palette knife and a wet paper towel. 

This thing has taken on a mind of its own. 

I continue to paint with a palette knife and a wet paper towel. 

subborealstudios:

Business animal portraits. 9-16 of 24.

My friends are way talented.

(via aosid)

Some days this job is simply unreal. 
Today we published on The Brain Scoop the video wherein Anna Goldman and I prepared a two-faced calf, and Mental_Floss video uploaded a video I wrote and hosted about extinct lifeforms, filmed at one in the morning some number of months ago. I started my morning at breakfast with a member of the board of trustees for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, came into work and Anna had texted me saying I’ve got the head of a lion with me. We opened the stinking bag in the hallway of the administrative offices, receiving gratuitous looks and wrinkled noses from people walking by. Tom and I spent some time in the vertebrate paleontology collection where we were shown the fossilized skull of one of the earliest mammals to walk the planet, a collective ancestor of all members of Mammalia today. We touched the abscessed cavity of an 11,000-year-old mammoth while viewing aisle after aisle of long-extinct precidential lifeforms. We put in a long day and ended it over grilled cheese sandwiches and pints of beer, laughing at the ridiculousness and unbelievable nature of our day. And sometimes I just have to sit and marvel, and write it all down, because it’s completely unreal. 
The song is Bach’s Sonata No. 1, the Adagio movement, which I’ve been practicing for well over twelve years. 

Some days this job is simply unreal. 

Today we published on The Brain Scoop the video wherein Anna Goldman and I prepared a two-faced calf, and Mental_Floss video uploaded a video I wrote and hosted about extinct lifeforms, filmed at one in the morning some number of months ago. I started my morning at breakfast with a member of the board of trustees for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, came into work and Anna had texted me saying I’ve got the head of a lion with me. We opened the stinking bag in the hallway of the administrative offices, receiving gratuitous looks and wrinkled noses from people walking by. Tom and I spent some time in the vertebrate paleontology collection where we were shown the fossilized skull of one of the earliest mammals to walk the planet, a collective ancestor of all members of Mammalia today. We touched the abscessed cavity of an 11,000-year-old mammoth while viewing aisle after aisle of long-extinct precidential lifeforms. We put in a long day and ended it over grilled cheese sandwiches and pints of beer, laughing at the ridiculousness and unbelievable nature of our day. And sometimes I just have to sit and marvel, and write it all down, because it’s completely unreal. 

The song is Bach’s Sonata No. 1, the Adagio movement, which I’ve been practicing for well over twelve years.